Big dogs will no longer have to be made very small in SNCF trains

Until now, the masters of animals over six kilos had to pay a ticket equivalent to “50% of the full price of a second place, calculated on the basis of the mileage scale”. Adobe Stock / Kriste

The national railway company is finally reviewing its copy: all doggies are now housed in the same boat.

Good news for owners of Labradors, German Shepherds or Bernese Mountain Dogs. A few days before the start of the summer holidays, the SNCF has just announced that it is reviewing its sales policy for dog owners.

Until now, masters traveling with animals weighing more than six kilos had to pay a ticket equivalent to “50% of the full price of a second place, calculated on the basis of the mileage scale”. This led to an incongruity: on certain routes, if the traveler benefited from a particular offer, the dog paid more than his master. A situation all the more absurd that said “dog ticket” does not confer a reserved seat on the train. And that the SNCF specifies that the presence of animals on board is only “tolerated” and therefore subject to “the agreement of other travelers”…

Failing to go back on this double inconsistency, the company has just taken a step forward in terms of pricing. The rule will now be the same for all dogs, whether small or large. Everyone will now benefit from a fixed price ticket of €7, regardless of the destination. Another advance: these tickets, which until now have only been distributed in paper version, will be available in e-ticket format on the SNCF Connect application. Finished, therefore, the obligation to go through a terminal to print them.

Caution is still required, however, to avoid hitches as the big departures approach. We cannot strongly advise you to book first class: the “dog rate” will be the same and you will have more space. Also remember to choose your seat so as not to be cramped in a square, at the mercy of neighbors who are not necessarily well disposed towards animals.


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